GREEN STOOP CHALLENGE

Even the smallest green space can make a difference.
Find one and make it your own!

Native plants are not only beautiful but support local wildlife like birds and butterflies and help filter polluted runoff keeping our streams and harbor clean. What can you plant in your community – pits, strips, plots or pots?

What is a “Green Stoop”?

The stoop is an iconic component of urban Baltimore architecture, a gathering space and an extension of your home. When this space includes a tree pit, the stoop is providing another important community service as street trees beautify a street, clean the air, reduce stormwater runoff and increase home values. Urban residents may not think of their stoop as significant green infrastructure but, when added together, the tree pits of Baltimore City make up hundreds of acres of green space. We challenge you to green your stoop – remove invasive weeds and trash, plant native plants. Will you accept the challenge?

HOW TO GREEN YOUR STOOP

Remove weeds and waste

Replace with mulch and native plants

Water and watch it grow!

Share your photos on social media using #GreenStoop

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

To beautify your community and clean your environment

We recommend pits, strips, plots and pots!

Beautiful native plants that support local wildlife like birds and butterflies.

  1. Remove weeds and waste
  2. Replace with mulch and native plants
  3. Water and watch it grow!
  4. Share your photos on social media using #GreenStoop
  1. PITS – Tree pits are best if they have been recently planted with a new tree, though barren pits without trees can also work. Pits with established trees may not have space for additional plantings.
  2. STRIPS – Urban areas have many small and unloved green spaces. Look around and see if you can find one near your home.
  3. PLOTS – The City is full of different types of garden plots – butterfly gardens, community gardens, rain gardens – seek one out and ask a local nonprofit or community organization how you can get involved.
  4. POTS – Can’t find a place to plant? Making your own is a last resort. Why not add some beautiful native plants in pots to the front of your home?
  1. Print out this flier and share it with them
  2. Start with a couple conversations and then host a block meeting to gage interest. It’s amazing what resources a group of neighbors can come up with!

If you live within one of the Harris Creek Watershed neighborhoods, contact Leanna Wetmore 443-996-6271. Neighborhoods: Patterson Park, Oliver, McElderry Park, Milton-Montford, Darley Park, Middle East, Bocek Park-Madison East, Highlandtown, Patterson Place, Berea, Canton.

See our native plant guide.

Perennials come back every year; natives are most tolerant to Baltimore conditions and offer more wildlife benefits. Annuals are one and done though they can drop seeds and be easy and beautiful. A mix can be nice- we recommend zinnias and sunflowers as easy seed packets to try.

You have a couple options:

  1. Do it yourself by calling MISS Utility to make sure you have space and can dig out front. It should cost about $300-400 to hire a contractor to cut a 4×8 space
  2. However, we recommend organizing larger projects in this case and engaging your community association in the need for trees. Non-profits have access to community grant funds that may be able to help pay for pit cuts and help organize planting projects.

You can get one! If you have an empty tree pit, you can request a tree from the city’s Department of Forestry, www.TreeBaltimore.org

Perennials come back every year; natives are most tolerant to Baltimore conditions and offer more wildlife benefits. Annuals are one and done though they can drop seeds and be easy and beautiful. A mix can be nice- we recommend zinnias and sunflowers as easy seed packets to try.

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